Lightning

The Uber Early Steps (Salesforce Lightning Chronicles)

By Guest Author: Rachel Rogers

To most people one of the scariest words in the English language is “change”. It makes the best of us want to head for the hills or duck for cover. However for a few us, we dig our heels in and brace ourselves to wrestle it to the ground. I may only be 5’2” but show me the lion and I will tame him to a kitten to make it safe for everyone to pass.

When Salesforce rolled out Lightning I had a few days of ‘soaking in’ to do and then it was game time. You see a year ago, I broached the subject of change to our business and allowed them time to freak out. We went through 9 months of resistance, negotiations, roadmap evaluations, and the whole well there is a notion of ‘feature parody’ that we need. Then it was time to put a plan in place to start a full scale re-implementation. Yes, I said re-implementation because for an 8 year old org nothing is easy, quick, or nimble for migrating 8 years of customization to a new platform.

This series will take you through this journey. By the time it is complete we will have taken 18 months to make the full move. Now, take into consideration 9 months of that was based on waiting for features to become available. Well, let’s take a deep breathe and press forward, shall we?

The Uber Early Steps

Have you ever walked into a room with a topic you feel might be controversial? Like a good game of office politics might erupt because your topic was not on the transformational agenda? Well that is what this Salesforce Admin felt introducing Lightning to the business. I was about to inform the company that had used Salesforce for over 7 years that the User Interface they knew was going to transform into a somewhat unrecognizable format.

This didn’t mean that Lightning isn’t great or better for the company, it is just simply different. It is an unplanned change by the business’s viewpoint. This is something they didn’t sign up for, but instead something that was forced unto them to continue to use a platform they love. Well, here goes nothing!

early steps

That meeting went something like, “I want to introduce you to the upgraded version of Salesforce that is rolling out. It takes the existing Salesforce platform and amplifies the experience in new and exciting ways.” {Shares desktop, absolute silence} I could have heard a pin drop louder than the sounds in the room with Sales Operations. My next sentence, “I understand that this looks a lot different than what you are used to and tests your knowledge of the Icon Concept, but let’s walk through it.” This 30 minute meeting seemed like one of the longest meetings I have ever conducted.

I hung up the phone and thought, well this will be interesting. There wasn’t really much of a conversation until the end of the Summer 2016. Then the real fun began. There was an hour long meetings that I took a different approach to.

This approach was more from a position of, “Look team this is happening, you are receiving no new features on Classic. The only question we have is when do you want to move. We have done a technical  assessment and know what we need to update code wise to make this work. All I need to know is from an End User Changement Management perspective when you will be ready.” {Exhale and brace myself for response.} The response I got was, “Well let’s see what the reps think first.” {Slightly perplexed} “Alright, then how about I conduct Blind Studies with your top Sales Reps and top Salesforce Users and see how they respond. Then after we gather that information, will you agree to set a go live plan in motion?” {Time then seems to crawl and a slow motion movie plays out with visual cues, until} “Agreed.”

Follow our blog for the next instalment of the (Salesforce) Lightning Chronicles: The Blind Study

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