Lightning

The Blind Study (Salesforce Lightning Chronicles)

By Guest Author: Rachel Rogers

Let’s say you’ve just committed to conducting a global Blind Study, but you aren’t exactly sure what it is going to entail. I mean there is really no industry standard for a “Blind Study”, right? Well the cool part is you get to make it up!

So I started with the first step of figuring out who should participate in the study. Followed quickly with handing that off to the really smart Sales Operations group to go find people that matched the criteria. We decided that we needed a mixture of Sales Representatives and Sales Managers.The criteria for either group was either excelled at Sales or good Salesforce User. I know you are saying, aren’t those the same? Well while we would all hope they were, it doesn’t always equate that way. I wasn’t interested in who fit which criteria, just that they were all represented.

So easy peasy right? Well, turns out you should add one more criteria: “agreeing to what the appropriate sample size”. When you don’t add that criteria, you end up with 26 people you need to conduct one hour sessions with. Then you throw in the fact that you committed to having them done within a week, make that the week after Dreamforce, ummm yeah…..

Well all of that madness aside, the other thing that needed planning was how the sessions were going to be conducted. Some groups like to take the approach of recording each session and then playing them back to get feedback, but let’s go collaborative. I decided to pull most of my team and my trusty Sales Operations counterparts into these meetings. They were going to be called “Observers”. Partly because I loved the Sci-Fi show Fringe, but mainly because this was going to be their job. They were not to interact with the users, simply observe and take copious notes on what they saw. They were split into three teams with specific functions:

  • Process

Goal: Look for ways that things could be streamlined for the particular process the user is trying to accomplish.

Example: In the previous UI there were hoover links that took people directly to related lists, but in the new UI those are gone. Is there a simpler way to accomplish tasks by page layouts changes or is there process optimization to prevent them from needing to access particular related lists?

  • Concepts

Goal: Identify which areas appear to be ‘natural/self-learned’ versus items that cause the users a harder time to identify.

Example: In the previous version tasks/activities were listed in a “to do” list area and now are listed in the “assistant”. Is this easy for people to understand or do they struggle to find where items are listed?

  • Technical

Goal: Identify any elements that are not working in the application that users hit technical roadblocks. Anything in this section will be an immediate fix for development.

Example: The custom Javascript button on the Opportunity page is not displaying so the user is unable to complete the requested activity.

The next thing was to write a script so that we could take away the variables in what we asked the users to do. We wanted to control as many variables as we could so that the results would not be swayed. The important thing to writing the script was to determine what functions we thought a user should be able to accomplish in the given time window while still allowing them time to ask questions. To do this, I went back to the Sales Process and thought about the most common functions this group would be requested to do on a daily/weekly basis. I also wanted to make sure that the script never instructed a user ‘how to’ do something. It was important that we gauge natural learning/transition patterns versus influenced instruction patterns. Think of this more as watching

Follow our blog for the next instalment of the (Salesforce) Lightning Chronicles

 

Lightning

The Uber Early Steps (Salesforce Lightning Chronicles)

By Guest Author: Rachel Rogers

To most people one of the scariest words in the English language is “change”. It makes the best of us want to head for the hills or duck for cover. However for a few us, we dig our heels in and brace ourselves to wrestle it to the ground. I may only be 5’2” but show me the lion and I will tame him to a kitten to make it safe for everyone to pass.

When Salesforce rolled out Lightning I had a few days of ‘soaking in’ to do and then it was game time. You see a year ago, I broached the subject of change to our business and allowed them time to freak out. We went through 9 months of resistance, negotiations, roadmap evaluations, and the whole well there is a notion of ‘feature parody’ that we need. Then it was time to put a plan in place to start a full scale re-implementation. Yes, I said re-implementation because for an 8 year old org nothing is easy, quick, or nimble for migrating 8 years of customization to a new platform.

This series will take you through this journey. By the time it is complete we will have taken 18 months to make the full move. Now, take into consideration 9 months of that was based on waiting for features to become available. Well, let’s take a deep breathe and press forward, shall we?

The Uber Early Steps

Have you ever walked into a room with a topic you feel might be controversial? Like a good game of office politics might erupt because your topic was not on the transformational agenda? Well that is what this Salesforce Admin felt introducing Lightning to the business. I was about to inform the company that had used Salesforce for over 7 years that the User Interface they knew was going to transform into a somewhat unrecognizable format.

This didn’t mean that Lightning isn’t great or better for the company, it is just simply different. It is an unplanned change by the business’s viewpoint. This is something they didn’t sign up for, but instead something that was forced unto them to continue to use a platform they love. Well, here goes nothing!

early steps

That meeting went something like, “I want to introduce you to the upgraded version of Salesforce that is rolling out. It takes the existing Salesforce platform and amplifies the experience in new and exciting ways.” {Shares desktop, absolute silence} I could have heard a pin drop louder than the sounds in the room with Sales Operations. My next sentence, “I understand that this looks a lot different than what you are used to and tests your knowledge of the Icon Concept, but let’s walk through it.” This 30 minute meeting seemed like one of the longest meetings I have ever conducted.

I hung up the phone and thought, well this will be interesting. There wasn’t really much of a conversation until the end of the Summer 2016. Then the real fun began. There was an hour long meetings that I took a different approach to.

This approach was more from a position of, “Look team this is happening, you are receiving no new features on Classic. The only question we have is when do you want to move. We have done a technical  assessment and know what we need to update code wise to make this work. All I need to know is from an End User Changement Management perspective when you will be ready.” {Exhale and brace myself for response.} The response I got was, “Well let’s see what the reps think first.” {Slightly perplexed} “Alright, then how about I conduct Blind Studies with your top Sales Reps and top Salesforce Users and see how they respond. Then after we gather that information, will you agree to set a go live plan in motion?” {Time then seems to crawl and a slow motion movie plays out with visual cues, until} “Agreed.”

Read more in our next blog: The Blind Study (Salesforce Lightning Chronicles)

Lightning

The (Salesforce) Lightning Chronicles

Can I have a show of hands – Ok who loves Salesforce Lightning? It’s pretty cool what you can do in Lightning isn’t it!!

Now keep you hand up if you have considered the migration from Salesforce Classic to Lightning? How many of you have actually made the move? It was pretty easy wasn’t it? Well the reality is for most organisations and customers it isn’t easy and there is a lot that you need to consider before making the move.

During Dreamforce I was chatting with some fellow Salesforce MVP’s about the migration and how you need to plan and manage the migration. During that conversation, and one in particular with Rachel Rogers, we were saying wouldn’t it be great if we had some guidance to ensure the migration was a success. That’s when Rachel said – “Hang on! We’re doing that right now. Why don’t we publish a blog series about the journey and how you can manage it”.

Welcome to The (Salesforce) Lightning Chronicles!! This series will provide you with insights into how to manage your migration to Lightning. As we proceed through the journey the blog will become more technical but it starts with planning and the change management elements that are often missed in most projects.

But first let me introduce Rachel.

Rachel Rogers says she doesn’t just think outside the box; she lost the box entirely 10 years ago when she started working with Salesforce.

Rachel is a Certified Salesforce Administrator, Houston Salesforce User Group Leader, Creator of the HUG Gives Back Program, Dreamforce Speaker, and three-year Salesforce MVP. Rachel enjoys thinking about ‘what ifs’ and turning them into tangible solutions. Her passion is helping organisations leverage technology and training to enhance their business processes.

In addition to all the above Rachel is also the Sr. IT Manager at BMC Software overseeing their Global Salesforce Roadmap, Salesforce Governance and Release Schedules.

Rachel Rogers

We hope you find the series useful and it helps you as you migrate and start using Lightning.

Our first blog in the series – The Uber Early Steps